A Visit with Purple Door Ice Cream

P1070562 My earliest memories of eating ice cream are with Bubby, sitting at the kitchen table in our one bedroom, third floor walk up in West Rogers Park.   Chocolate was her favorite flavor evident by her all too often stained house coats and pockets plump with tissue.  Deliberately she would place each spoonful of ice cream into her mouth as she closed her eyes and swallowed.  When the bowl was close to being finished, Bubby would etch the spoon around the bowl as it collected the very last bits of melted chocolate ice cream.  She wasted nothing and savored every mouthful.

During those years, our apartment where we lived with Bubby would often become chaotic and if there were any quiet at all, it usually drifted into the back of the apartment, into our kitchen. There we would sit, among the burnt orange teapots dotting the wallpaper, the lamp above the table whose painted stars we lit for Papa Jack on night’s like his birthday, among the towels which draped from cabinet handles, and the canned fruits and vegetables strategically placed so her blindness would not stop her from knowing what was in her own pantry.   It was there where we sat and munched and slurped and scooped, licked our fingers and wiped ourselves clean.  The simplicity of those moments has never been lost on me, and  with the winter in Chicago being so brutal coupled with working long days and not seeing my Olive as often as I’d like, I have found great joy in the simple moments myself, always highly aware and savoring every moment.

When I was invited by Lauren and Steve Schultz of Purple Door Ice Cream to visit their new build-out, set to open in mid-March, I was thrilled.  I had first heard of their ice cream on an episode of Wisconsin Foodies.  At that time they were working out of Clock Shadow Creamery, a cheese purveyor  down the street.  Now, with their grand opening around the corner, Lauren and her husband Steve are expanding the team at Purple Door Ice Cream to include a part-time ice cream maker.  “Up until now it was me and Steve making every batch by hand.”  When I asked Lauren about the inspiration behind her store, she said “It had been a dream of mine since middle school.”   It was that same imagination and tenacity that helped bring Lauren’s dream to fruition. What sets Purple Door apart from other ice creams is the simplicity and boldness of its flavor.  Using local ingredients and hand crafting every batch, Purple Door Ice Cream keeps its taste simple, its texture rich, and does not disappoint in flavor.  “We have eleven base flavors, but we hand swirl all of our mix-ins.  We want to keep the integrity of the ice cream.”   The fourteen percent butterfat uses milk and cream from Wisconsin dairy farms while their quality ingredients are carefully selected from local artisans including Anodyne coffee beans, Rishi tea leaves, chocolate and even liqueurs to name a few.   “Sourcing locally provides a lot of inspiration”, Lauren tell us as she pulls pints for Matt and I to sample.  With the expansion of their store, Purple Door Ice Cream will also branch out into local restaurants and stores in Wisconsin and the Chicagoland area including Whole Foods, Mariano’s and Southport Grocery.

Chicago has seen dreary weather for many months now, and although I find myself longing for the sun’s affection, I try to acknowledge the small moments that are my own bit of sunlight; Olive’s infectious smile in the morning, Matt’s grasp as he helps me hurdle the snow, tastes of rich ice cream on a blustery February afternoon.  Our visit to Purple Door Ice Cream reminded me that summer isn’t so far away, and in the meantime I have much to celebrate.  For Lauren and Steve, they are growing their company while staying close to their Midwestern roots.  For Bubby, she celebrated hugs from me and my sister and bowls of chocolate ice cream.  Former Olympic runner and noted author, Don Kardong once said “Without ice cream, there would be darkness and chaos.”  Lauren’s invitation (and the many, indulgent helpings of ice cream) helped bring light to this forever winter, evoking memories with Bubby, who in a time of uncertainty and confusion was always my forever light. 2060_771183305330_3658_n

Pork Belly and Chickpea Chili- A Comeback Story

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I am not sure I have ever made chili but maybe once in my life…probably because I really do not like beans and therefore stay away from chili.  This weekend, however,  I found myself not only making chili but also tasting lots of it after my friend Amy asked me to help with her first ever annual chili cook-off for charity.  Her idea was to invite folks who would decide if they wanted to be chili makers or chili tasters, and in addition raise funds for The Greater Chicago Food Depository, a charity that provides thousands of meals to people in the Chicagoland area everyday.    Cook-off and charity sounded like a no-brainer at first, but to be honest I was not sure I would be able to participate.  Being swamped at work with a variety of agendas I wasn’t sure how I could make another commitment.  Beginning to struggle back and forth about whether or not I could commit, I realized something very important which has catapulted a new attitude for me about the year ahead.  Sounds heavy, doesn’t it?  I mean, I get it.  When did chili become so profound?  But what this cook-off gave me was the opportunity to choose between stressing over whether or not this would fit into my schedule or embracing the commitment and trusting there would be time because food and event planning are things I love to do — things I want to be doing always and more of — so the decision to do this cook-off wasn’t just about “Could I?” it was about seeing an opportunity and embracing it.

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Here is what I mean when I say “an exploration into a richer life” because you never know what may come of something and it can’t be wrong if it is something you truly love.  So when the world said, “Here — here is something that you love to do”,  I did it, and the reward was amazing.  Unfortunately, my pork belly, chickpea chili did not win (I mean, it was pretty awesome and got the praises of the TND crew- so, definite personal win), but regardless the whole day was really brilliant.  Everything seemed to flow right.  It was a day full of good food, good beer, good people, everyone down to be down.  I met some wonderful people at the cook-off and visited with more friends late into the evening over wine, little bites, and fulfilling conversation about art, theatre, food, travel….gah- I love stuff like this.  At the end of the night, while looking back at the happy mess of empty glasses among leftover cheese rinds and bits of mustard and relishes left strewn about, I scoffed at the fact that I had even considered not doing the cook-off.   I saw how the commitment paid off in evolving friendships and laughter coupled with ideas and stories that went on in my head long after everyone had gone home.  I had decided in that moment that this year is going to be a great year.  It is going to be my year, and with this post I re-claim my title as food (and sometimes travel) blogger, and am excited about what’s in the works, which includes a visit to Purple Door Ice Cream in Milwaukee and a sit down with my new fave gal pal and outstanding food stylist- Johanna Lowe of Martyn George.  In the meantime, here is my pork belly, chickpea chili recipe especially for you my dear Chicago friends.  This is sure to unearth you from the cold and warm your bellies and your hearts.  Unless you don’t like pork belly, but then you’re probably not reading my blog anyway.P1070362

RECIPE

*This recipe is from The New Best Recipe Cookbook from America’s Test Kitchen.  This is my go to cookbook for solid, standard recipes.  Great if you are not an expert chef, and useful if you need a base from which you can add personal touches.  I adapted their Beef Chili with Kidney Beans recipe just a bit by adding more or less spices here and there, and exchanging the beef for ground pork belly and the beans for chickpeas.  Make a night or two ahead if you can.  Chili is always best when it has had some time to rest.

ingredients

2tbl veg or corn oil

2 med onions finely chopped

1 red bell pepper, cut into 1/2 in cubes

6 garlic cloves, pressed

1/4 Adobo Chili powder

1 tbl freshly ground cumin

2 tsp freshly ground coriander

1-2 tbl red pepper flakes

1 tsp Herbs de Provence (original recipe calls for dried oregano)

1/2tsp cayenne pepper

2 lbs ground pork belly (ask your butcher to grind the meat for you if you do not have a meat grinder at home)

2 15 oz cans of garbanzo beans (rinsed)

1 can diced tomatoes

1 can tomato puree

salt

lime wedges for serving

Instructions:

Heat the oil in a large dutch oven over medium heat.  Add onions, bell peppers, garlic, chili powder, cumin, coriander, pepper flakes, Herbs de Provence, cayenne, and cook — stirring occasionally until the onion and pepper are softened and browning — approx 10 mins.  Increase the heat to med-high, add half of the pork belly, cook for 3 or 4 minutes breaking the meat up as you mix, then add the other half of the pork.  Stir for 3 to 4 more minutes. Add beans, tomatoes, tomato puree, salt, bring to a boil then bring back down to a simmer and cook covered for one hour.  In the second hour, take the lid off but continue to simmer for 6o minutes.  Once it has simmered, take off of the heat and adjust seasoning.  If making a day or two in advance, let the chili cool to room temp before putting it in the fridge.  If serving right away, squeeze in a half to whole lime and mix throughout.